Mary Kastle – special offer for Consultant Journal readers

We love Mary Kastle, who we’ve profiled several times on this site. The musician and musical entrepreneur is back with a new CD on the Black Hen label.

Special offer for Consultant Journal readers
If you write a review of Mary Kastle’s CD, Beneath the Folds, on your blog or website and repost it on her iTunes or CD Baby page, she’ll send you a free album. You can download three tracks on the Mary Kastle music page or contact Mary if you want to hear the full album in digital format. Your post, which can be negative or positive or neutral, needs to be at least 75 words long and be posted on Mary’s iTunes page here: http://itunes.apple.com/ca/album/beneath-the-folds/id373901914 or her CD Baby page here: http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/marykastle1, so that people can judge for themselves too. Once you’ve made the post, contact Mary and she’ll hook you up with a signed copy of the new album as a gift for you.
 

Beneath the Folds

“A little bit of folk, a little bit of jazz and a lot of soul,” is the way Kastle describes the musical mix on an album that includes reggae, bossa nova, swing, gospel, and a pinch of piano bar vibe from her years of playing jazz and pop standards in lounges. With the groove as her signature, Kastle’s versatile palette has evoked comparisons to other soulful songsmiths such as Norah Jones, Stevie Wonder, and Tori Amos.
 

About Mary Kastle’s new album

Consistent with the writing on her two previous EPs, Fresh Air and Another Swing, Kastle’s propensity for exploring themes around self expression and inner growth comes through loud and clear on Beneath the Folds, but with a newfound directness. “Early on in the writing process, a close friend challenged me to be more direct in my songwriting, both lyrically and musically. The result was a shift in my approach and a deeper appreciation for what I had to offer as a musician. Some of the first songs that came, like “Drop Your Cover,” are about letting your guard down and just being yourself. I found the blues and some really old-school gospel forms to be quite conducive to expressing those ideas.”
Kastle’s inspired mix of new and old musical forms also coincided with a major shift in the world around her. “Bush was leaving office and Obama was coming in, and there was a lot of hope and disappointment being felt simultaneously. Around me people were losing their jobs and many of the women I was observing were struggling with tough decisions like striking a balance between career vs. family. This is reflected in the subtext in songs like “Beggin’,” “Julia,” “Fortress” and “False Alarm.” The stories are personal, but they also mirror big picture political and social shifts.”
 

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